City urges clearing of catch basins

CITY OF THE DALLES
Department of Public Works
1215 W 1st Street

The Dalles, Oregon 97058

PRESS RELEASE

DATE: January 13, 2017

TOPIC: Snow clearing operations and safety reminders

CONTACT: City of The Dalles Public Works Department (541) 296-5401

FOR RELEASE: IMMEDIATELY

As winter weather conditions persist in the area, it is important for residents to remember that they play an important role in snow clearing activities and safety.

The City of The Dalles Public Works requests that both commercial and private property owners help clear storm water catch basin grates in front of their property to help prevent flooding and freezing hazards, especially as temperatures are forecast to increase next week and significant melting is expected. Storm water catch basins divert water from the streets in The Dalles to the storm water collection system and ultimately to the Columbia River. If catch basins are not cleared of snow, ice, and other debris, water is prevented from draining from City streets. As the snow melts, water pools along streets and can cause localized flooding or re-freezing if the catch basins aren’t clear.

To clear a catch basin, remove snow and ice or any other debris after a storm to maintain the openings in the grate. Do not attempt to remove the grid, only clear the debris on top of the grate.

The City would also like remind residents that safety is our top concern. Please do not allow children to play on or around open streets during or after a storm, and ensure children know to stay at least 50 feet away from operating equipment. Please make sure children do not build snow forts or tunnels in the snow piled along roadways; these tunnels may collapse without warning and children can be trapped or injured by the weight of the collapsing snow.

 

Public invited to provide input on National Scenic Area Management Plan Tuesday, Jan 17

Hood River, Ore. – The Columbia River Gorge Commission and Forest Service have scheduled listening sessions to seek input from the public on the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area Management Plan.

In November, the Gorge Commission launched a multi-year review and revision process called Gorge 2020.

“Gorge 2020 is an opportunity for communities and stakeholders throughout the Gorge to bring their ideas and insights about how we can continuously improve our approach to protecting the Gorge’s spectacular resources,” said Krystyna Wolniakowski, executive director of the Gorge Commission.

Congress directed the Gorge Commission to conduct a review every 5 -10 years to determine whether any parts of the National Scenic Area’s Management Plan should be revised. The original plan was released in 1997, and was last reviewed and revised by the Gorge Commission and Forest Service from 2000 to 2004.

“We always value public input,” said Lynn Burditt, scenic area manager, “This process allows us to consider the public’s ideas about our management plan – where it does a good job of accomplishing our mission and what issues and improvements should be considered for revision.”

The public can submit comments on how the management plan can best accomplish the National Scenic Area’s mission to protect and enhance scenic, natural, cultural, and recreational resources of the Columbia River Gorge while encouraging local economic development consistent with that protection.

The public can learn more about the management plan and provide comments at one of the public listening sessions being held this month:

· January 17. 6:00–8:00 p.m. – Ft. Dalles Readiness Center. 402 E. Scenic Drive, The Dalles, OR
· January 24. 6:00–8:00 p.m. – Hampton Inn, 1 Nichols Parkway, Hood River, OR
· January 31. 6:00–8:00 p.m. – Bonneville Event Center, 102 CBD Mall Drive, North Bonneville, WA

In case of inclement weather, the listening session will be cancelled within 24 hours of its scheduled date and time and an alternate date and location will be announced on the Commission’s website.

Written comments can be submitted by emailing planreview@gorgecommission.org or filling out an online form at http://www.gorgecommission.org/. This initial public comment opportunity will close on March 8, 2017, and there will be future opportunities for public comment and additional workshops in spring and summer of this year.

Any proposed revisions to the plan will ultimately be reviewed by the Secretary of Agriculture, who determines whether to give final concurrence.

###

The Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area Act was passed by Congress in 1986 to protect and provide for the enhancement of the scenic, cultural, recreational and natural resources of the Columbia River Gorge, and to protect and support the economy of the Columbia River Gorge area by encouraging growth to occur in existing urban areas and by allowing future economic development in a manner consistent with the goals of the Act. More information on the Gorge Commission is available on the web at www.GorgeCommission.org.

The Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area encompasses 292,500 acres of Washington and Oregon, where the Columbia River cuts a spectacular river canyon through the Cascade Mountains. The USDA Forest Service manages National Forest lands in the National Scenic Area and works with the Gorge Commission, states, counties, treaty tribes, and partners to protect and enhance scenic, natural, cultural, and recreational resources of the Columbia River Gorge while encouraging local economic development consistent with that protection. Learn more about Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area at www.fs.usda.gov/crgnsa or follow us on social media at facebook.com/crgnsa or www.twitter.com/crgnsa.

 

Friday January 13 Closures and delays 6:00 am update

Closures and delays for Friday, Jan 13

TWO HOURS LATE

• North Wasco Co. SD 21 – 2 Hours Late
• St. Mary’s Academy in The Dalles – 2 Hours Late
• Horizon Christian – Hood River – 2 Hours Late. The bus will run.
• Centerville Sch. Dist. – 2 Hours Late, Buses on snow routes
• Klickitat Sch. Dist. – 2 Hours Late
• Skamania Sch. Dist. 2 – 2 Hours Late. buses on snow routes, no bus service on Duncan Creek Road.
• Stevenson-Carson Sch. Dist. – 2 Hours Late, Buses on snow routes
• White Salmon Sch. Dist. – 2 Hours Late
CLOSED

• All classes are cancelled at Columbia Gorge Community College today, but both campuses will be open and staff should report to work as scheduled.

• Mt. Pleasant Sch. Dist. – Closed

HEAD START

• OCDC Headstart -Odell and The Dalles staff report at 10 a.m. for pre-service.

OTHER

• Cascade Singers concert previously scheduled for Saturday has been postponed until May 4

• The monthly meeting of the Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society scheduled for January 14th, has been canceled due to weather.

 

Union Pacific asks judge to declare they don’t have to follow local land use laws

Union Pacific Railroad, which had its request for four new miles of a second track at Mosier denied by Wasco County Commissioners in November, isn’t waiting until spring to hear the appeal it filed with the Columbia River Gorge Commission.

The railroad filed a complaint for declaratory and injunctive relief in federal district count Tuesday in Portland. The suit was filed against the members of the Wasco County Commission, against Wasco County Planning Director Angie Brewer and against the Oregon members of the Columbia River Gorge Commission, all of whom were individually named in the suit but in their official capacity rather than as citizens.

The suit advances two arguments that the railroad has maintained from the beginning of the process. First, that federal law preempts the county permitting process, and, second, that any attempt to put limits or constraints on their traffic is a violation of the Interstate Commerce Clause of the U.S. Constitution.

Gorge Commission staff attorney Jeff Litwak says the commission is are still studying the case and the pending appeal before the Commission will continue to move forward unless a court tells the Commission that it cannot.

You can read the original complaint as filed by the railroad by clicking on the red PDF button below:

 

 

Read

Rep. Gina McCabe delivers Republican response to governor’s State of the State address

Rep. Gina McCabe, R-Goldendale, delivered the Republican response to the governor’s state of the state speech Wednesday in Olympia.

LINK to video

McCabe focused on securing a better future for Washingtonians by preparing students for the marketplace and changing industry needs, improving the economic landscape statewide to attract and retain jobs, and government remaining accountable to taxpayers by exercising fiscal responsibility in state budgeting.

“As a business owner, I’ve balanced budgets, made tough decisions and built lifelong relationships with the people who depend on me for a paycheck. I’ve also seen how government regulations have hindered business growth, and how they have affected an employer’s ability to create and retain jobs,” McCabe said. “We must foster an environment conducive to job growth so families can offer themselves and their children a better tomorrow.”

Also acknowledged during her speech was the Legislature’s efforts to comply with the state Supreme Court’s McCleary ruling and provide full funding for basic K-12 education. McCabe cited the already 48 percent of the state operating budget funds going toward K-12 education, and suggested student success requires both dollars and additional career and technical education opportunities.

“Success in and for our schools shouldn’t solely be measured by the amount of dollars in the system. Dropping more money in the bucket does little good if our students aren’t prepared for the job market. We must emphasize better student outcomes and closing the skills gap,” she said.

She also emphasized the need for accountability at all levels of government, including the Legislature.

“You hired us to do a job – prioritize spending, fund essential programs and ensure the investments we make lead to results. Like any manager would, we ask that you hold us to that commitment and share your ideas for moving Washington forward. It’s our duty to be your voice,” said McCabe.

McCabe’s full speech is below.

 

Rep. Gina McCabe
Republican response to governor’s State of the State address
Jan. 11, 2017

Hello, I’m State Representative Gina McCabe. It’s an honor to be here today speaking with you about the values we share as Washingtonians.

We’ve just ended a tough election cycle. As a result, some have disengaged from politics and their government. While I can understand their frustrations, together we can make a positive difference.

This is an exciting time for our state. With a closely divided Legislature, we have great opportunities for bipartisan, balanced solutions to advance. Will there be times we disagree? Absolutely. But there are good people on both sides of the aisle committed to making Washington state an even better place to live, work and raise a family.

There is far more that unites us than divides us in our state Legislature. We agree every child deserves a quality education, regardless of their ZIP code. We believe people should have the opportunity and ability to hold good-paying jobs that provide for them and their families. We want to find ways for commuters to spend less time idling in traffic and more time with friends and family. We care deeply about the most vulnerable among us, and want to connect people to pathways that can offer hope and a bright future. We value the health of our environment and public lands, and seek policies that promote sustainability and stewardship. And we agree that if we send your hard-earned dollars to state agencies, they should function with integrity and accountability.

House Republicans have three major priorities that help guide the decisions we make in Olympia: provide students with a world-class education; empower families and strengthen communities; and protect taxpayers by holding state agencies accountable.

When it comes to education, we have a unique constitutional obligation to fulfill. It is the paramount duty of our state to fully fund basic public education for all Washington children. We’ve made historic investments in K-12 education the last four years, including smaller K-3 class sizes, full-day kindergarten, and teacher raises. More than 48 percent of the state operating budget is now dedicated to K-12 education. But the work isn’t done. And the progress we make will no doubt be one of the biggest headlines in 2017.

Success in and for our schools shouldn’t solely be measured by the amount of dollars in the system. Dropping more money in the bucket does little good if our students aren’t prepared for the job market. We must emphasize better student outcomes and closing the skills gap. Today, more than three out of four job openings in Washington require education beyond high school. By 2023, that number is projected to increase, and most of those positions will require mid-level education or training. Despite the need for an educated workforce, less than a third of Washington students go on to attain a post-secondary credential today. In order to prepare our students for Washington jobs, we must expand career and technical education opportunities in our public schools.

Increasing these opportunities and improving other K-12 programs is just the beginning. Last biennium, Republicans led the charge in reducing tuition at our state colleges and universities. By cutting tuition, we lessened and, for some, eliminated a major financial hurdle for those who believe post-secondary education is out of reach. We’ve also championed other solutions to make higher education more affordable, including freezing tuition, and finding ways to reduce the costs of textbooks and course materials.

The future of our economy is bright, but it hinges on our ability to ensure our students can compete in the marketplace and adapt to changing industry needs.

We must empower our families today if we want to secure the health and prosperity of our state for future generations. Every Washingtonian should have the opportunity to contribute to – and benefit from – a healthy, robust economy.

As a business owner, I’ve balanced budgets, made tough decisions and built lifelong relationships with the people who depend on me for a paycheck. I’ve also seen how government regulations have hindered business growth, and how they have affected an employer’s ability to create and retain jobs. And with a higher minimum wage to be phased in the next four years, the impacts it will have on small businesses, rural economies and teen employment are concerning.

We must foster an environment conducive to job growth so families can offer themselves and their children a better tomorrow. It’s troubling the governor has released a budget that relies on billions of dollars of new taxes. These proposals do not foster business expansion, they stifle it. And they would hit hardest employers and people who are the very backbone of our economy. Even more troubling is some of the revenue to pay for his spending plan would come from a carbon tax.

Like the governor, we are also committed to preserving the beautiful environment we’ve had entrusted to us. That’s why we’ve been a part of collaborative solutions to: clear fish passages; prevent wildfires; prioritize forest health; remove old legacy nets throughout the Puget Sound, and so much more.

We are proud to have the sixth cleanest state economy in the country and boast more than 100,000 green jobs. Should we strive to be number one? Of course we should! Our healthy environment and focus on clean energy is what attracts so many families, job-seekers and employers alike. But the governor’s proposals would have little impact on the global challenges our environment faces.

And let’s recognize just how far we’ve already come. Washington now emits less CO2 than we did in 1990, despite population increases. That’s exceptional.

Efforts to be responsible stewards of our land shouldn’t come at an expense of job creation. Instead, our high standards of habitat protection should work in harmony with our efforts to grow the economy.

With unsustainable proposals that target hard-working Washingtonians and key industries, it’s no wonder people are so frustrated by government – they don’t feel like their voices are being heard in Olympia.

If you ask any CEO, business owner or manager: in order to earn the trust of your employees, you must be transparent and maintain a high level of integrity. We, as lawmakers, were hired by the people of our legislative districts to do a job – make government work more effectively, and steward your hard-earned tax dollars responsibly.

Unfortunately, the governor’s most recent budget proposal would cost taxpayers billions.

Seattle’s strong economy has been used as an indicator that the overall state economy is also improving. While this success should be celebrated, robust growth is not shared statewide.

Communities in Grays Harbor, Skamania and Klickitat counties, once home to booming timber industries, tell an all too familiar tale that represents a vast number of small, rural towns that have faced economic devastation. Take Grays Harbor, for example. With closures of two mills the past decade, hundreds of family wage jobs have been lost.

The economic landscape in the Puget Sound is much different. In King County, 20 percent of the households earn an income of $150,000 or more. Compare that to Grays Harbor, Cowlitz, or even my own Klickitat County, where only five percent or less of households take in that level of income.

Despite the uneven economic landscape, the governor has offered a spending plan that is unsustainable and doesn’t include many tough decisions. His taxes would generate $11 billion over the next four years yet this is still not enough to support his new spending proposals. What’s more is some of these taxes have already been rejected by both the Legislature and you, the voters, in the past.

We need serious solutions that will advance our economy statewide, prioritize schools and essential services, and encourage job growth and business investment.

Government accountability doesn’t start and end with the governor. But when people continue to see high-profile failures in our state’s transportation, correctional and mental health systems, it’s easy to understand why public trust has eroded over time.

Let me be clear: our state has great public employees that administer critical programs and services for Washingtonians. We respect and appreciate these dedicated employees. But we must continue to hold the leadership of state agencies accountable for their decisions and results.

And yes, when we talk about government accountability, that includes the Legislature.

We are ultimately responsible for what proposals reach the governor’s desk. You hired us to do a job – prioritize spending, fund essential programs and ensure the investments we make lead to results. Like any manager would, we ask that you hold us to that commitment and share your ideas for moving Washington forward. It’s our duty to be your voice.

Thank you so much…and may God bless each of you and this beautiful state.

 

Thursday January 12 closures and delays as of 5:45 am

Thursday, Jan 12 Closures and delays as of 5:45

2 HOURS LATE

• Centerville Sch. Dist. – 2 Hours Late, Buses on snow routes
• Dufur Sch. Dist. – 2 Hours Late
• Goldendale Sch. Dist. – 2 Hours Late
• Hood River Co. Sch. Dist. – 2 Hours Late, Buses on snow routes
• Horizon Christian – Hood River – 2 Hours Late. No bus run
• Klickitat Sch. Dist. – 2 Hours Late. MS game with Lyle has been canceled
• Mill A Sch. Dist. – 2 Hours Late. Buses on snow routes (Little Rock Creek road, and above Willard)
• Sherman Co. Sch. Dist. – 2 Hours Late
• Stevenson-Carson Sch. Dist. – 2 Hours Late, No AM preschool, Buses on snow routes
• White Salmon Sch. Dist. – 2 Hours Late. No bus service provided to Little Buck Creek, Lacock-Kelchner, or Acme Roads until further notice.
• Wishram Sch. Dist. – 2 Hours Late, No AM preschool

CLOSED
• Columbia Gorge Communitty College – Closed both campuses
• Lyle Sch. Dist. – Closed
• Mt. Pleasant Sch. Dist. – Closed
• North Wasco Co. SD 21 – Closed
• Skamania Sch. Dist. 2 – Closed
• St. Mary’s Academy – Closed

HEAD START

• Mid-Columbia Children’s Council – The Dalles EHS/Head Start closed. The Dalles Child Care/Wahtonka Child Care open 9-4; Petersburg Head Start Closed; Carson Head Start AM class Cancelled, PM class on time Parent Meeting canceled;Goldendale Center is 2 hour delay; Belmont Drive Head Start Closed; Country Club Head Start AM class 10:30-2, PM class canceled;

OTHER

Residents of Klickitat County should have normal garbage service for Thursday. If you were missed on Wednesday, call Republic Service at 509-773-5825.

MCEDD meeting originally scheduled today at Dufur City Hall has been moved to the MCEDD office at 5:15 East Second Street today at 9 am

Senior meal in Goldendale is cancelled for Thursday, January 12th.
Mt. Adams Transportation Service only essential medical trips

 

MCMC – what’s open and what’s closed?

MCMC Closures Update:

The following clinics are CLOSED today:
– MCMC Surgical Services (closing at noon)
– Water’s Edge Mind & Body Medicine
– MCMC Therapy Services (Hood River and The Dalles)
– Sleep Medicine
– Dermatology (closing at noon)
– Cardiology (closing at noon)
The following clinics are OPEN today:
– Water’s Edge Fitness Center (open until 5pm)
– Columbia River Women’s Center (may close early this afternoon depending on cancellations)
– MCMC Family Medicine
– MCMC Internal Medicine (at Water’s Edge)
– MCMC Sports Medicine & Orthopaedic Surgery
– Occupational Health (may close early)
– Gorge Urology (Hood River location may close early)
Our Mindfulness Meditation class for tonight (Jan 11 at 7:00-8:30pm) has also been canceled due to weather.